• Report: Korea-Japan Youth Conference 2016
    - Transformation of Energy for Nuclear-Free World -
    (Aug 1- 4, 2016)

    Korea-Japan Youth Conference 2016, a joint program by YWCA of Japan and National YWCA of Korea, took place under the theme of “Transformation of Energy for Nuclear-Free World” in Busan, Korea from 1st to 4th August 2016. 14 people from YWCA of Japan, together with 20 people from National YWCA of Korea participated in this conference, and learned and discussed nuclear energy, which is an issue commonly shared by both countries.


    A lecture of “Transformation of Energy for Nuclear-Free World –dreaming of nuclear free Asia” given on the first day enabled the participants to be aware that the nuclear energy issue is not confined to a domestic agenda but should be addressed from a broader perspective bringing the entire North-East Asia into its view.


     

    On the 2nd day, the participants took a fieldwork around Kori nuclear power plant, the oldest nuclear power plant in Korea, following presentations by the youth members from YWCAs of Japan and Korea respectively.
    After active anti-nuclear movement by Busan citizens took place in response to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster,
    it has been decided that Kori 1 reactor unit would be shut down in 2017.
    Yet, construction of Shin Kori 5 and 6 reactor units were recently approved, making the area one of the places which are most densely populated by nuclear power plants.
    The fieldwork included a visit to villages which were ordered to evacuate for construction of nuclear power plants, huge power transmission lines, and talks from a local resident and activists against nuclear power and pollution.
    It was an opportunity for the participants to learn about the reality of damages caused by nuclear energy and strengthen their will of opposition.

     


    They also held an anti-nuclear campaign at Haeundae beach. It was featured by several local media.

     

    On the 3rd day, they went to an eco-village “Dandelion Community”, and learned about attempts on sustainable circular agriculture and self-sufficient energy production.


     

    The participants enjoyed a cultural exchange event in which they played games and performed dances.

     

    Finally, they collaboratively endorsed action plans to be implemented as steps for a nuclear-free world.

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